Kyk-Over-Al
Word of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Article of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

This Day in History
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Today's Birthday
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

In the News
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Quotation of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Match Up
Match each word in the left column with its synonym on the right. When finished, click Answer to see the results. Good luck!

 
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Hangman
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary
Google

Thursday, April 27, 2006

Rosa Parks, Proof share Woodlawn mausoleum


It's insult to rights leader, some say

April 26, 2006

Email this Print this BY JOE SWICKARD and CECIL ANGEL

FREE PRESS STAFF WRITERS


Proof's given name, Deshaun Dupree Holton, is inscribed on the wall of the mausoleum where he is entombed near Rosa Parks at Woodlawn Cemetery in Detroit. (AMY LEANG/Detroit Free Press)
People wanting to pay homage to civil rights icon Rosa Parks at Detroit's Woodlawn Cemetery Chapel named in her honor will now have to pass by the crypt of rapper Proof, who was killed in a shootout in an after-hours bar.

The rapper's crypt -- with golden lettering spelling out his given name of Deshaun Dupree Holton set above his professional name Proof -- is just inside the main entrance of the gothic stone chapel. Parks' crypt is just around a corner from Proof's, in the most prominent section of the building.

"I tell you, this is a lot to take in; I'm pretty much stunned," said Parks' nephew William McCauley.

"I don't see the appropriateness of someone like this young rapper being buried with Rosa Parks," McCauley said. "She was a person of nonviolence. And obviously this young rapper had a different creed when it comes to resolving issues."

The burial of a performer whose music could be a raw and rude reflection of tough urban life so close to Parks, also jarred McCauley's attorney, Lawrence Pepper of Farmington Hills. Pepper said Parks -- whose arrest in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., city bus sparked a nonviolent revolution that helped sweep away legal racial segregation -- exemplified dignity and steely resolve.

"I don't think his music is anything like Mrs. Parks," said Pepper. "To me, it's disrespect to Rosa Parks."

Benjamin Chavis, former executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and a cofounder of the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network, said he had worked with both Parks and Proof. He said Parks would not have turned Proof away.

http://www.freep.com/

Link Posted by jebratt :: Thursday, April 27, 2006 :: 1 comments

Post a Comment

---------------oOo---------------