Kyk-Over-Al
Word of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Article of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

This Day in History
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Today's Birthday
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

In the News
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Quotation of the Day
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Match Up
Match each word in the left column with its synonym on the right. When finished, click Answer to see the results. Good luck!

 
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary

Hangman
Free website content provided by The Free Dictionary
Google

Friday, March 31, 2006

Book Review: Saint Sea: Poetry and Prose (1986)


Saint Sea: Poetry and Prose (1986) a collection of the works of two poets, features sixteen selections by St. Croix resident Marty Campbell. Ranging in length from three lines to three pages, the poems and prose sketches are playful and contemplative. On the light side, we are introduced to Mr., Mrs., and Ms. Tipit, talking trees; a pet named "Dog th Frog" [sic] who recites his own humble "pomes," and a car, Belly Boo, that the poet releases to the wild like a mustang. Listening to these voices, conversing with others (an egg being pressured to hatch, shopkeepers, a bus driver) and ruminating on private treasures, nature or special friends all lead the poet to a celebration of life as it is—an insight which he urges his reader to seek: "You can do it, too, you know./To yourself. just sit down. Walk away some day and sit down./And don't turn on the radio." Campbell also "plays" with the language, effectively drawing on the resources of the vernacular in three poems. (A brief glossary explains the non-conventional orthography and local flora alluded to.) Other formal experiments include the poem "Take a Turn," which is read from the bottom up to parallel the germination and growth of a sunflower, and "andtheohgodthesandyesi," first written as sixteen lines of unspaced words and then as separated ones, "and the sand oh god the sand yes i." The second half of the book contains selections by Joe Blondo, a poet who lives in Seattle.

Roberta Q. Knowles

Posted by jebratt :: Friday, March 31, 2006 :: 0 comments

Post a Comment

---------------oOo---------------